Amaranthaceae - amaranth family
 

WeedsPoisonous PlantsHay Fever
Gerald A. Mulligan
Research Scientist and Research Institute Director (retired) and presently Honorary Research Associate, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada,
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C6, Canada

Awarded the Lawson Medal by the Canadian Botanical Association in 2006
Read his biography "The Real Weed Man" available in print and ebook.
Amaranthus powellii S.Watson, green pigweed, amarante de Powell An annual herb, with erect stems from 1 to 6 ft. (3 to 18 dm.) tall, that reproduces by seed. It has a long, narrow, terminal spike. This contrasts with the relatively short, thick, and compact spike of redroot pigweed. Green pigweed probably was originally a native of the southwestern United States and adjacent Mexico, but it has now become naturalized as a weed in agricultural fields, gardens, roadsides, railways, and waste places in most of the United States and in the extreme southern part of Canada.

Amaranthus retroflexus L.,redroot pigweed, amarante racine rouge
Annual, spreading by seeds; autogamous and wind-pollinated; stems 2 inches to 4 feet (5 cm. to 12 dm.) high.; flowers inconspicuous; throughout; widespread in gardens, row crops, waste places, and along roadsides; has a characteristic red root; native to North America. Poisoning and death of pigs and cattle has occurred after the ingestion of large quantities of this plant.

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Weed Name Photo Weed Name Photo
green pigweed, amarante de Powell green pigweed, amarante de Powell
green pigweed, amarante de Powell (seedling) redroot pigweed, amarante racine rouge
redroot pigweed, amarante racine rouge redroot pigweed, amarante racine rouge (young plant)
redroot pigweed, amarante racine rouge (seedling) redroot pigweed, amarante racine rouge (NC)